Leite, Jorge

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Leite
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Jorge
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Jorge Leite
Biografia
Jorge Leite obtained his PhD in 2011 from the University of Minho, where he also completed his Psychology Degree in 2005. From 2013 to 2016, he underwent postdoctoral training at the Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Currently, he holds the positions of Vice-Rector for Research, Associate Professor, and Coordinator of the CINTESIS.UPT. Throughout his career, he has made significant contributions to the field, with over 70 peer-reviewed publications, including articles in journals, book chapters, and conference proceedings. According to Scopus data, over half of his publications are featured in the top 25% of journals, while 45% are among the top 25% most cited documents globally. He has also supervised numerous MSc dissertations and is currently overseeing four PhD theses. Furthermore, he actively participates in various research projects, taking on roles such as Principal Investigator, Researcher, and Supervisor. These projects have successfully secured over 6M euros in funding. His dedication to his work has been recognized with seven awards and/or honors. Furthermore, he has collaborated with 167 fellow researchers in various scientific endeavors.
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I2P - Instituto Portucalense de Psicologia
Portucalense Institute for Psychology (I2P) is a R&D unit devoted to the study of cognition and behavior in context. With an interdisciplinary focus, namely on Education,Translational and Applied Psychology

Resultados da pesquisa

A mostrar 1 - 10 de 24
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Speed of Processing (SoP) Training Plus α-tACS in people with mild cognitive impairment: a double blind, parallel, placebo controlled trial study protocol
    2022-07-14 - Leite, Jorge; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge
    Several cognitive training programs, alone or in combination with non-invasive brain stimulation have been tested in order to ameliorate age-related cognitive impairments, such as the ones found in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). However, the effects of Cognitive Training (CT)—combined or not—with several forms of non-invasive brain stimulation have been modest at most. We aim to assess if Speed of Processing (SoP) training combined with alpha transcranial alternating current stimulation (a-tACS) is able to increase speed of processing as assessed by the Useful Field of View (UFOV), when comparing to SoP training or active a-tACS alone. Moreover, we want to assess if those changes in speed of processing transfer to other cognitive domains, such as memory, language and executive functioning by using the NIH EXAMINER. We also want to test the mechanisms underlying these interventions, namely brain connectivity and coherence as assessed by electroencephalography (EEG). To that purpose, our proposal is to enroll 327 elders diagnosed with MCI in a double-blinded, parallel randomized clinical trial assessing the effects of combining SoP with alpha endogenous tACS (either active or sham) in people with MCI. Participants will perform an intervention that will last for 15 sessions. For the first 3 weeks, participants will receive nine sessions of the intervention, and then will receive two sessions per week (i.e., booster) for the following 3 weeks. They will then be assessed at 1, 3, and 6 months after the intervention has ended. This will allow us to detect the immediate, and long-term effects of the interventions, as well as to probe the mechanisms underlying its effects.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Digitalized transcranial electrical stimulation: a consensus statement
    2022-09-05 - Brunoni, André R; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Antal, Andrea; Auvichayapat, Paradee; Baeken, Chris; Benseñor, Isabela M; Bikson, Marom; Boggio, Paulo; Borroni, Barbara; Brighina, Filippo; Brunelin, Erome; Carvalho, Sandra; Caumo, Wolnei; Ciechanski, Patrick; Charvet, Leigh; Clark, Vincent P; Kadosh, Roi Cohen; Cotelli, Maria; Datta, Abhishek; Deng, Zhi-De; Raedt, Rudi De; Ridder, Dirk De; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Floel, Agnes; Frohlich, Flavio; George, Mark S; Ghobadi-Azbari, Peyman; Goerigk, Stephan; Hamilton, Roy H; Jaberzadeh, Shapour J; Hoy, Kate; Kidgell, Dawson J; Zonoozi, Arash Khojasteh; Kirton, Adam; Laureys, Steven; Lavidor, Michal; Lee, Kiwon; Leite, Jorge; Lisanby, Sarah H; Loo, Colleen; Martin, Donel M; Miniussi, Carlo; Mondino, Marine; Monte-Silva, Katia; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Nitsche, Michael A; Okano, Alexandre H; Oliveira, Claudia S; Onarheim, Balder; Pacheco-Barrios, Kevin; Padberg, Frank; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester M; Palm, Ulrich; Paulus, Walter; Plewnia, Christian; Priori, Alberto; Rajji, Tarek K; Razza, Lais B; Rehn, Erik M; Ruffini, Giuliov; Schellhorn, Klaus; Zare-Bidoky, Mehran; Simis, Marcel; Skorupinski, Pawel; Suen, Paulo; Thibaut, Aurore; Valiengo, Leandro C L; Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; Vanneste, Sven; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Violante, Ines R; Wexler, Anna; Woods, Adam J; Fregni, Felipe; Leite, Jorge
    Objective: Although relatively costly and non-scalable, non-invasive neuromodulation interventions are treatment alternatives for neuropsychiatric disorders. The recent developments of highly-deployable transcranial electric stimulation (tES) systems, combined with mobile-Health technologies, could be incorporated in digital trials to overcome methodological barriers and increase equity of access. The study aims are to discuss the implementation of tES digital trials by performing a systematic scoping review and strategic process mapping, evaluate methodological aspects of tES digital trial designs, and provide Delphi-based recommendations for implementing digital trials using tES. Methods: We convened 61 highly-productive specialists and contacted 8 tES companies to assess 71 issues related to tES digitalization readiness, and processes, barriers, advantages, and opportunities for implementing tES digital trials. Delphi-based recommendations (>60% agreement) were provided. Results: The main strengths/opportunities of tES were: (i) non-pharmacological nature (92% of agreement), safety of these techniques (80%), affordability (88%), and potential scalability (78%). As for weaknesses/ threats, we listed insufficient supervision (76%) and unclear regulatory status (69%). Many issues related to methodological biases did not reach consensus. Device appraisal showed moderate digitalization readiness, with high safety and potential for trial implementation, but low connectivity. Conclusions: Panelists recognized the potential of tES for scalability, generalizability, and leverage of digital trials processes; with no consensus about aspects regarding methodological biases. Significance: We further propose and discuss a conceptual framework for exploiting shared aspects between mobile-Health tES technologies with digital trials methodology to drive future efforts for digitizing tES trials.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    The acute impact of the early stages of COVID-19 pandemic in people with pre-existing psychiatric disorders: A systematic review
    2022-04-23 - Carvalho, Sandra; Coelho, Catarina G.; Kluwe-Schiavon, Bruno; Magalhães, Juliana; Leite, Jorge; Leite, Jorge
    People with pre-pandemic health conditions are more vulnerable and more likely to suffer greater psychosocial impact due to the current COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown measures. Thus, the objective of this work was to systematically review the impact of the early stages COVID-19 pandemic on people with pre-existing psychiatric disorders. The search was performed between 23 January and 2 September 2021 in PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE. A total of 4167 published results were identified; however, only 49 were included in this review. Results show that there was considerable heterogeneity among studies, which resulted in a low consensus. However, it seems that the impact of the first stage of the COVID-19 pandemic on psychiatric disorders was two-fold: (1) an overall effect, in which people suffering from psychiatric disorders in general experienced more psychological distress and anxiety when compared to people who had no psychiatric diagnosis, and (2) a condition-specific effect, namely in people suffering from eating disorders and obsessive compulsive disorders. Moreover, the current work highlights that there were also some external factors that were related to worsening symptoms. For instance, unemployment or experiencing work and financial difficulties can be a trigger for greater distress during the pandemic for people with mood disorders, and being alone and in social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic may actually increase substance use and relapse rates. Further studies are needed to prospectively investigate the long-term effects of the current COVID-19 pandemic on people with (pre)-existing psychiatric conditions and on the onset or deterioration of psychiatric-related symptoms in a larger number of participants, as well as exploring the long-term effects of the current pandemic on mental health.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Polarity specific effects of cross-hemispheric tDCS coupled with approach-avoidance training on chocolate craving
    2019-01-24 - Carvalho, Sandra; Sampaio, Adriana; Mendes, Augusto José; Lema, Alberto; Vieira, Daniela; Leite, Jorge; Leite, Jorge; Gonçalves, Óscar F.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Longitudinal Clinical Trial Recruitment and Retention Challenges in the Burn Population: Lessons Learned from a Trial Examining a Novel Intervention for Chronic Neuropathic Symptoms
    2019 - Ohrtman, Emily A.; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Carvalho, Sandra; Shie, Vivian L.; Leite, Jorge; Ianni, Corinne Rose; Kazis, Lewis E.; Ross Zafonte, Ross Zafonte; Ryan, Colleen M.; Schneider, Jeffrey C.; Fregni, Felipe; Leite, Jorge
    Long-term trials are key to understanding chronic symptoms such as pain and itch. However, challenges such as high attrition rates and poor recruitment are common when conducting research. The aim of this work was to explore these issues within a long-term randomized control trial using transcranial direct current stimulation to treat pain and itch. This parallel double blinded, placebo-controlled randomized trial was comprised of 15 transcranial direct current stimulation visits and 7 follow-up visits. Participants were over the age of 18, had a burn injury that occurred at least 3 weeks before enrollment, and reported having pain and/or itch that was moderate to severe in intensity. A total of 31 subjects were randomized into either an active or sham transcranial direct current stimulation groups. There were no significant differences between the groups in terms of age, race, education, baseline depression, or anxiety. The median dropout time was at visit 19 (visit 16 [SE = 1.98] for the sham group and visit 19 [SE = 1.98] for the active group). Analysis showed no differences in the dropout rate between groups [χ2(1) = 0.003, P = .954]. The dropout rate was 46.7% for the sham group and 43.8% for the active group. Overall, 45.2% of the subjects dropped out of the trial. Long-term clinical trials are an essential part of evaluating interventions for symptoms such as chronic pain and itch. However, as seen in this trial, long-term studies in the burn population often face recruitment and adherence challenges.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Restrito
    Non-pharmacological treatment-related changes of molecular biomarkers in major depressive disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysisTagedEnd
    2023-01-24 - Irwin, Courtney L.; Coelho, Patrícia S.; Kluwe-Schiavon, Bruno; Silva-Fernandes, Anabela; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge
    Background: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious mood disorder and leading cause of disability. Despite treatment advances, approximately 30% of individuals with MDD do not achieve adequate clinical response. Better understanding the biological mechanism(s) underlying clinical response to specific psychopharmacological interventions may help fine tune treatments in order to further modulate their underlying mechanisms of action. However, little is known regarding the effect of non-pharmacological treatments (NPTs) on candidate molecular biomarker levels in MDD. This review aims to identify molecular biomarkers that may elucidate NPT response for MDD. Methods: We performed a systematic review and a multilevel linear mixed-effects meta-analyses, and a metaregression. Searches were performed in PubMed, Scopus, and PsycINFO in October 2020 and July 2021. Results: From 1387 retrieved articles, 17 and six studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analyses, respectively. Although there was little consensus associating molecular biomarker levels with symptomology and/or treatment response, brain metabolites accessed via molecular biomarker-focused neuroimaging techniques may provide promising information on whether an individual with MDD would respond positively to NPTs. Furthermore, non-invasive brain stimulation interventions significantly increased the expression of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) compared to sham/placebo, regardless of add-on pharmacological treatment. Conclusions: NTFs are candidate biomarkers to fine-tune NIBS for MDD treatment.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Restrito
    Transcranial direct current stimulation as an add-on treatment to cognitive-behavior therapy in first episode drug-naïve major depression patients: The ESAP Study Protocol
    2020-11-03 - Carvalho, Sandra; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Brunoni, André R.; Fernandes-Gonçalves, Ana; Fregni, Felipe; Leite, Jorge; Leite, Jorge
    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) affects more than 264 million people worldwide. Current treatments include the use of psychotherapy and/or drugs, however ∼30% of patients either do not respond to these treatments, or do not tolerate the side effects associated to the use of pharmacological interventions. Thus, it is important to study non-pharmacological interventions targeting mechanisms not directly involved with the regulation of neurotransmitters. Several studies demonstrated that transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) can be effective for symptoms relief in MDD. However, tDCS seems to have a better effect when used as an add-on treatment to other interventions.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    The effects of direct current stimulation and random noise stimulation on attention networks
    2021-03-18 - Lema, Alberto; Carvalho, Sandra; Fregni, Felipe; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Leite, Jorge; Leite, Jorge
    Attention is a complex cognitive process that selects specific stimuli for further processing. Previous research suggested the existence of three attentional networks: alerting, orienting and executive. However, one important topic is how to enhance the efficiency of attentional networks. In this context, understanding how this system behaves under two different modulatory conditions, namely transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial Random Noise Stimulation (tRNS), will provide important insights towards the understanding of the attention network system. Twenty-seven healthy students took part on a randomized single-blinded crossover study, testing the effects that involved three modalities of unilateral stimulation (tRNS, anodal tDCS, and sham) over the DLPFC, during the performance of the attention network test (ANT) in three different conditions: standard, speed and accuracy. Results showed that tRNS was able to increase attention during more complex situations, namely by increasing alerting and decreasing conflict effect in the executive network. Under the Speed condition, tRNS increased efficiency of the alerting network, as well as under the more demanding conflict network, tRNS overall increased the performance when comparing to sham. No statistical significant effects of tDCS were observed. These results are compatible with the attention requiring the synchronization of pre-existing networks, rather the reinforcement or creation of new pathways.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Probing the relationship between late endogenous ERP components with fluid intelligence in healthy older adults
    2020-07-07 - Teixeira-Santos, Ana C.; Pinal, Diego; Pereira, Diana R.; Leite, Jorge; Carvalho, Sandra; Sampaio, Adriana; Leite, Jorge
    The world population is rapidly aging, bringing together the necessity to better understand the advancing age. This characterization may be used to aid early diagnosis and to guide individually-tailored interventions. While some event-related potential (ERP) components, such as the P300 and late positive complex (LPC), have been associated with fluid intelligence (Gf) in young population; little is known whether these associations hold for older people. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to assess whether these ERP components are associated with Gf in the elderly. Fifty-seven older adults performed a continuous performance task (CPT) and a visual oddball paradigm while EEG was recorded. Participants were divided into two groups, according to their performance in the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices test: high-performance (HP) and low-performance (LP). Results showed that the HP group, compared to the LP group, had higher LPC amplitudes in the CPT and shorter P300 latencies in the oddball task, highlighting the role of ERP components as a potential electrophysiological proxy of Gf abilities in the elderly.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Transcranial direct current stimulation decreases P3 amplitude and inherent Delta activity during a waiting impulsivity paradigm: Crossover study
    2024-02-07 - Mendes, Augusto J.; Galdo-Álvarez, Santiago; Lema, Alberto; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge
    The inability to wait for a target before initiating an action (i.e., waiting impulsivity) is one of the main features of addictive behaviors. Current interventions for addiction, such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), have been suggested to improve this inability. Nonetheless, the effects of tDCS on waiting impulsivity and underlying electrophysiological (EEG) markers are still not clear. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effects of neuromodulation over the right inferior frontal gyrus (rIFG) on the behavior and EEG markers of reward anticipation (i.e., cue and target-P3 and underlying delta/theta power) during a premature responding task. For that, forty healthy subjects participated in two experimental sessions, where they received active and sham tDCS over the rIFG combined with EEG recording during the task. To evaluate transfer effects, participants also performed two control tasks to assess delay discounting and motor inhibition. The active tDCS decreased the cue-P3 and target-P3 amplitudes, as well as delta power during target-P3. While no tDCS effects were found for motor inhibition, active tDCS increased the discounting of future rewards when compared to sham. These findings suggest a tDCS-induced modulation of the P3 component and underlying oscillatory activity during waiting impulsivity and the discounting of future rewards.