The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Portugal: The role of personality traits and emotion regulation strategies

dc.contributor.authorKluwe-Schiavon, Bruno
dc.contributor.authorZorzi, Lucas De
dc.contributor.authorMeireles, Joana
dc.contributor.authorLeite, Jorge
dc.contributor.authorSequeira, Henrique
dc.contributor.authorCarvalho, Sandra
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-12T09:41:15Z
dc.date.available2022-09-12T09:41:15Z
dc.date.issued2022-06-17
dc.description.abstractRecent evidence suggests that both personality traits (PT) and emotion regulation (ER) strategies play an important role in the way people cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was two folded. First, to longitudinally investigate the psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and stress levels) taking in consideration PT and ER strategies in 3 different moments: during the first lockdown period (April/20), at the first deconfinement (May/20) and 1-month after the first deconfinement (Jun/20)–Experiment I. Second, to cross-sectionally evaluate the impact of the pandemic in psychological distress and the correlates with PT and ER 6-months after the first deconfinement November/20 to February/21 –Experiment II. A total of 722 volunteers (Experiment I = 180; Experiment II = 542) aged 18 years or older participated in this online survey. The findings from Experiment I show that psychological distress decreased after the lockdown period, however, neuroticism traits predicted higher levels of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms, while difficulties in ER strategies were identified as a risk factor for depression and stress. For experiment II, neuroticism traits and being infected with COVID-19 were associated to higher levels of symptomatology, while unemployment and the use of emotional suppression strategies to cope with emotional situations were associated to depressive and anxiety symptoms. Although the psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak decreased over time in our sample, the current findings suggest that difficulties in emotional regulation and high levels of neuroticism traits might be potential risk factors for psychiatric symptomatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, people with difficulties in ER and neuroticism traits would benefit from psychological interventions that provide personality-appropriate support and promote emotion regulation skills during stressful events, such as the case of the global pandemic.pt_PT
dc.identifier.citationKluwe-Schiavon, B., De Zorzi, L., Meireles, J., Leite, J., Sequeira, H., & Carvalho, S. (2022). The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Portugal: The role of personality traits and emotion regulation strategies. PLoS ONE, 17(6):e0269496, 1-26. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0269496. Repositório Institucional UPT. http://hdl.handle.net/11328/4462pt_PT
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0269496pt_PT
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203 (Electronic)
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11328/4462
dc.language.isoengpt_PT
dc.peerreviewedyespt_PT
dc.publisherPlospt_PT
dc.rightsopen accesspt_PT
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/pt_PT
dc.subjectCOVID-19pt_PT
dc.subjectEmotion regulation strategiespt_PT
dc.subjectPsychological impactpt_PT
dc.subjectPortugalpt_PT
dc.subjectPersonality traitspt_PT
dc.titleThe psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Portugal: The role of personality traits and emotion regulation strategiespt_PT
dc.typejournal articlept_PT
degois.publication.firstPage1pt_PT
degois.publication.issue6pt_PT
degois.publication.lastPage26pt_PT
degois.publication.titlePLoS ONEpt_PT
degois.publication.volume17pt_PT
dspace.entity.typePublicationen
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