Leite, Jorge

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Leite

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Jorge

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Jorge Leite

Biografia

Jorge Leite obtained his PhD in 2011 from the University of Minho, where he also completed his Psychology Degree in 2005. From 2013 to 2016, he underwent postdoctoral training at the Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School. Currently, he holds the positions of Vice-Rector for Research, Associate Professor, and Coordinator of the CINTESIS.UPT. Throughout his career, he has made significant contributions to the field, with over 70 peer-reviewed publications, including articles in journals, book chapters, and conference proceedings. According to Scopus data, over half of his publications are featured in the top 25% of journals, while 45% are among the top 25% most cited documents globally. He has also supervised numerous MSc dissertations and is currently overseeing four PhD theses. Furthermore, he actively participates in various research projects, taking on roles such as Principal Investigator, Researcher, and Supervisor. These projects have successfully secured over 6M euros in funding. His dedication to his work has been recognized with seven awards and/or honors. Furthermore, he has collaborated with 167 fellow researchers in various scientific endeavors.

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CINTESIS.UPT - Centro de Investigação em Tecnologias e Serviços de Saúde
Centro de Investigação em Tecnologias e Serviços de Saúde (CINTESIS.UPT), former I2P, is an R&D unit devoted to the study of cognition and behaviour in context. With an interdisciplinary focus, namely on Education, Translational and Applied Psychology

Resultados da pesquisa

A mostrar 1 - 10 de 15
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Digitalized transcranial electrical stimulation: a consensus statement
    2022-09-05 - Brunoni, André R; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Antal, Andrea; Auvichayapat, Paradee; Baeken, Chris; Benseñor, Isabela M; Bikson, Marom; Boggio, Paulo; Borroni, Barbara; Brighina, Filippo; Brunelin, Erome; Carvalho, Sandra; Caumo, Wolnei; Ciechanski, Patrick; Charvet, Leigh; Clark, Vincent P; Kadosh, Roi Cohen; Cotelli, Maria; Datta, Abhishek; Deng, Zhi-De; Raedt, Rudi De; Ridder, Dirk De; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Floel, Agnes; Frohlich, Flavio; George, Mark S; Ghobadi-Azbari, Peyman; Goerigk, Stephan; Hamilton, Roy H; Jaberzadeh, Shapour J; Hoy, Kate; Kidgell, Dawson J; Zonoozi, Arash Khojasteh; Kirton, Adam; Laureys, Steven; Lavidor, Michal; Lee, Kiwon; Lisanby, Sarah H; Loo, Colleen; Martin, Donel M; Miniussi, Carlo; Mondino, Marine; Monte-Silva, Katia; Morales-Quezada, Leon; Nitsche, Michael A; Okano, Alexandre H; Oliveira, Claudia S; Onarheim, Balder; Pacheco-Barrios, Kevin; Padberg, Frank; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester M; Palm, Ulrich; Paulus, Walter; Plewnia, Christian; Priori, Alberto; Rajji, Tarek K; Razza, Lais B; Rehn, Erik M; Ruffini, Giuliov; Schellhorn, Klaus; Zare-Bidoky, Mehran; Simis, Marcel; Skorupinski, Pawel; Suen, Paulo; Thibaut, Aurore; Valiengo, Leandro C L; Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne; Vanneste, Sven; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan; Violante, Ines R; Wexler, Anna; Woods, Adam J; Fregni, Felipe; Leite, Jorge
    Objective: Although relatively costly and non-scalable, non-invasive neuromodulation interventions are treatment alternatives for neuropsychiatric disorders. The recent developments of highly-deployable transcranial electric stimulation (tES) systems, combined with mobile-Health technologies, could be incorporated in digital trials to overcome methodological barriers and increase equity of access. The study aims are to discuss the implementation of tES digital trials by performing a systematic scoping review and strategic process mapping, evaluate methodological aspects of tES digital trial designs, and provide Delphi-based recommendations for implementing digital trials using tES. Methods: We convened 61 highly-productive specialists and contacted 8 tES companies to assess 71 issues related to tES digitalization readiness, and processes, barriers, advantages, and opportunities for implementing tES digital trials. Delphi-based recommendations (>60% agreement) were provided. Results: The main strengths/opportunities of tES were: (i) non-pharmacological nature (92% of agreement), safety of these techniques (80%), affordability (88%), and potential scalability (78%). As for weaknesses/ threats, we listed insufficient supervision (76%) and unclear regulatory status (69%). Many issues related to methodological biases did not reach consensus. Device appraisal showed moderate digitalization readiness, with high safety and potential for trial implementation, but low connectivity. Conclusions: Panelists recognized the potential of tES for scalability, generalizability, and leverage of digital trials processes; with no consensus about aspects regarding methodological biases. Significance: We further propose and discuss a conceptual framework for exploiting shared aspects between mobile-Health tES technologies with digital trials methodology to drive future efforts for digitizing tES trials.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    The acute impact of the early stages of COVID-19 pandemic in people with pre-existing psychiatric disorders: A systematic review
    2022-04-23 - Carvalho, Sandra; Coelho, Catarina G.; Kluwe-Schiavon, Bruno; Magalhães, Juliana; Leite, Jorge
    People with pre-pandemic health conditions are more vulnerable and more likely to suffer greater psychosocial impact due to the current COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown measures. Thus, the objective of this work was to systematically review the impact of the early stages COVID-19 pandemic on people with pre-existing psychiatric disorders. The search was performed between 23 January and 2 September 2021 in PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE. A total of 4167 published results were identified; however, only 49 were included in this review. Results show that there was considerable heterogeneity among studies, which resulted in a low consensus. However, it seems that the impact of the first stage of the COVID-19 pandemic on psychiatric disorders was two-fold: (1) an overall effect, in which people suffering from psychiatric disorders in general experienced more psychological distress and anxiety when compared to people who had no psychiatric diagnosis, and (2) a condition-specific effect, namely in people suffering from eating disorders and obsessive compulsive disorders. Moreover, the current work highlights that there were also some external factors that were related to worsening symptoms. For instance, unemployment or experiencing work and financial difficulties can be a trigger for greater distress during the pandemic for people with mood disorders, and being alone and in social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic may actually increase substance use and relapse rates. Further studies are needed to prospectively investigate the long-term effects of the current COVID-19 pandemic on people with (pre)-existing psychiatric conditions and on the onset or deterioration of psychiatric-related symptoms in a larger number of participants, as well as exploring the long-term effects of the current pandemic on mental health.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Restrito
    Modulation of the cognitive event-related potential P3 by transcranial direct current stimulation: Systematic review and meta-analysis
    2022-01 - Mendes, Augusto J.; Pacheco-Barrios, Kevin; Lema, Alberto; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Fregni, Felipe; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been widely used to modulate cognition and behavior. However, only a few studies have been probing the brain mechanism underlying the effects of tDCS on cognitive processing, especially throughout electrophysiological markers, such as the P3. This meta-analysis assessed the effects of tDCS in P3 amplitude and latency during an oddball, n-back, and Go/No-Go tasks, as well as during emotional processing. A total of 36 studies were identified, but only 23 were included in the quantitative analysis. The results show that the parietal P3 amplitude increased during oddball and n-back tasks, mostly after anodal stimulation over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (p = 0.018, SMD = 0.4) and right inferior frontal gyrus (p < 0.001, SMD = 0.669) respectively. These findings suggest the potential usefulness of the parietal P3 ERP as a marker of tDCS-induced effects during task performance. Nonetheless, this study had a low number of studies and the presence of considerable risk of bias, highlighting issues to be addressed in the future.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Speed of Processing (SoP) Training Plus α-tACS in people with mild cognitive impairment: a double blind, parallel, placebo controlled trial study protocol
    2022-07-14 - Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge
    Several cognitive training programs, alone or in combination with non-invasive brain stimulation have been tested in order to ameliorate age-related cognitive impairments, such as the ones found in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI). However, the effects of Cognitive Training (CT)—combined or not—with several forms of non-invasive brain stimulation have been modest at most. We aim to assess if Speed of Processing (SoP) training combined with alpha transcranial alternating current stimulation (a-tACS) is able to increase speed of processing as assessed by the Useful Field of View (UFOV), when comparing to SoP training or active a-tACS alone. Moreover, we want to assess if those changes in speed of processing transfer to other cognitive domains, such as memory, language and executive functioning by using the NIH EXAMINER. We also want to test the mechanisms underlying these interventions, namely brain connectivity and coherence as assessed by electroencephalography (EEG). To that purpose, our proposal is to enroll 327 elders diagnosed with MCI in a double-blinded, parallel randomized clinical trial assessing the effects of combining SoP with alpha endogenous tACS (either active or sham) in people with MCI. Participants will perform an intervention that will last for 15 sessions. For the first 3 weeks, participants will receive nine sessions of the intervention, and then will receive two sessions per week (i.e., booster) for the following 3 weeks. They will then be assessed at 1, 3, and 6 months after the intervention has ended. This will allow us to detect the immediate, and long-term effects of the interventions, as well as to probe the mechanisms underlying its effects.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Editorial: Optimization strategies for pain management with neuromodulation
    2022-09-15 - Pacheco-Barrios, Kevin; Carvalho, Sandra; Caumo, Wolnei; Fregni, Felipe; Leite, Jorge
    Chronic pain is a high-priority global health issue due to its high prevalence, impact on quality of life, and cost (1). In most cases, chronic pain is challenging to manage, and the existing treatment modalities have reported frequent and severe adverse events, including gastritis (2), cardiovascular complications [...]
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Executive impairments in obsessive compulsive disorder: A systematic review with emotional and non-emotional paradigms
    2020-02 - Tubío Fungueiriño, Maria; Fernandez Prieto, Montse; Carvalho, Sandra; Carracedo, Angel; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Leite, Jorge
    Precedent: Impairments in executive functioning may be associated with compulsive symptoms in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control and working memory in OCD patients. using emotional and non-emotional paradigms. Method: we reviewed research published in PubMed, Web of Science, PsychInfo, Scopus, Scielo, and ProQuest Psychology databases, from January 2008 to April 2019. The review followed a two-stage process. In the first stage, we selected only studies using neutral stimuli paradigms, while in the second we selected executive-emotional paradigms. Results: The first stage of the review provided 16 final results, while the second stage, with emotional stimuli, provided 3 results. Conclusions: There is some initial evidence for the existence of executive impairments in OCD, as expressed in the performance and/or processing of working memory inhibitory control and cognitive flexibility. There is also initial evidence that these latter two could be modulated by the presentation or mental representation of negative valence stimuli or images, as well as the presence of aversive contingencies.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Restrito
    Transcranial direct current stimulation as an add-on treatment to cognitive-behavior therapy in first episode drug-naïve major depression patients: The ESAP Study Protocol
    2020-11-03 - Carvalho, Sandra; Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Brunoni, André R.; Fernandes-Gonçalves, Ana; Fregni, Felipe; Leite, Jorge
    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) affects more than 264 million people worldwide. Current treatments include the use of psychotherapy and/or drugs, however ∼30% of patients either do not respond to these treatments, or do not tolerate the side effects associated to the use of pharmacological interventions. Thus, it is important to study non-pharmacological interventions targeting mechanisms not directly involved with the regulation of neurotransmitters. Several studies demonstrated that transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) can be effective for symptoms relief in MDD. However, tDCS seems to have a better effect when used as an add-on treatment to other interventions.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in Portugal: The role of personality traits and emotion regulation strategies
    2022-06-17 - Kluwe-Schiavon, Bruno; Zorzi, Lucas De; Meireles, Joana; Sequeira, Henrique; Carvalho, Sandra; Leite, Jorge
    Recent evidence suggests that both personality traits (PT) and emotion regulation (ER) strategies play an important role in the way people cope with the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of this study was two folded. First, to longitudinally investigate the psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and stress levels) taking in consideration PT and ER strategies in 3 different moments: during the first lockdown period (April/20), at the first deconfinement (May/20) and 1-month after the first deconfinement (Jun/20)–Experiment I. Second, to cross-sectionally evaluate the impact of the pandemic in psychological distress and the correlates with PT and ER 6-months after the first deconfinement November/20 to February/21 –Experiment II. A total of 722 volunteers (Experiment I = 180; Experiment II = 542) aged 18 years or older participated in this online survey. The findings from Experiment I show that psychological distress decreased after the lockdown period, however, neuroticism traits predicted higher levels of depression, anxiety and stress symptoms, while difficulties in ER strategies were identified as a risk factor for depression and stress. For experiment II, neuroticism traits and being infected with COVID-19 were associated to higher levels of symptomatology, while unemployment and the use of emotional suppression strategies to cope with emotional situations were associated to depressive and anxiety symptoms. Although the psychological impact of the COVID-19 outbreak decreased over time in our sample, the current findings suggest that difficulties in emotional regulation and high levels of neuroticism traits might be potential risk factors for psychiatric symptomatology during the COVID-19 pandemic. Thus, people with difficulties in ER and neuroticism traits would benefit from psychological interventions that provide personality-appropriate support and promote emotion regulation skills during stressful events, such as the case of the global pandemic.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Restrito
    Mind wandering: Tracking perceptual decoupling, mental improvisation, and mental navigation
    2020-10-15 - Gonçalves, Óscar F.; Silva, Mariana Rachel Dias da; Carvalho, Sandra; Coelho, Patrícia; Lema, Alberto; Mendes, Augusto J.; Branco, Diogo; Collus, Jorge; Boggio, Paulo S.; Leite, Jorge
    Background: Mind wandering is a prevalent phenomenon. However, the concept of mind wandering is associated with distinct and often orthogonal concepts, and research- ers are still debating the best strategies to gain access to mind-wandering processes. Nonetheless, there is a progressive acknowledgment that mind wandering is a multi- dimensional and heterogeneous construct. We argue that to fully understand mind wandering, we need to look at dimensions assessing the process (i.e., perceptual decoupling), dynamics (i.e., mental improvisation), and content (i.e., mental naviga- tion). Objective: The objective of this study was to develop a self-report measure of mind wandering—the Mind Wandering Inventory (MWI)—to capture the heterogene- ity of mind wandering in terms of process, dynamic, and content components. Method: Five language versions of the MWI were administered to an international sample of 1,162 individuals. Results: Results showed that the MWI had good levels of internal consistency. In terms of internal structure, we found a first factor to index perceptual decoupling, a second to index mental improvisation, and a third to index mental navigation. Additionally, a study of concurrent validity with Spontaneous and Delib- erate Mind Wandering scales suggested that MWI has significant correlations with previous mind-wandering scales and that factors 1 (perceptual decoupling) and 2 (mental improvisation) seemed to be more closely associated with spontaneous than deliberate mind wandering. Finally, individuals coming from sciences major back- ground reported increased levels of mind wandering when compared with participants from both health, social and human sciences background.
  • PublicaçãoAcesso Aberto
    Working memory training coupled with transcranial direct current stimulation in older adults: A randomized controlled experiment
    2022-04-12 - Teixeira-Santos, Ana C.; Moreira, Célia S.; Pereira, Diana R.; Pinal, Diego; Fregni, Felipe; Carvalho, Sandra; Sampaio, Adriana; Leite, Jorge
    Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) has been employed to boost working memory training (WMT) effects. Nevertheless, there is limited evidence on the efficacy of this combination in older adults. The present study is aimed to assess the delayed transfer effects of tDCS coupled with WMT in older adults in a 15-day follow-up. We explored if general cognitive ability, age, and educational level predicted the effects. Methods: In this single-center, double-blind randomized sham-controlled experiment, 54 older adults were randomized into three groups: anodal-tDCS (atDCS)+WMT, sham-tDCS (stDCS)+WMT, and double-sham. Five sessions of tDCS (2 mA) were applied over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Far transfer was measured by Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices (RAPM), while the near transfer effects were assessed through Digit Span. A frequentist linear mixed model (LMM) was complemented by a Bayesian approach in data analysis. Results: Working memory training improved dual n-back performance in both groups submitted to this intervention but only the group that received atDCS+WMT displayed a significant improvement from pretest to follow-up in transfer measures of reasoning (RAPM) and short-term memory (forward Digit Span). Near transfer improvements predicted gains in far transfer, demonstrating that the far transfer is due to an improvement in the trained construct of working memory. Age, formal education, and vocabulary score seem to predict the gains in reasoning. However, Bayesian results do not provide substantial evidence to support this claim. Conclusion: This study will help to consolidate the incipient but auspicious field of cognitive training coupled with tDCS in healthy older adults. Our findings demonstrated that atDCS may potentialize WMT by promoting transfer effects in short-term memory and reasoning in older adults, which are observed especially at follow-up.